Outpatient Surgery

MRSA Is The Leading Cause Of Infections At Surgical Sites.

MRSA is now a leading cause of infections at surgical sites and in skin and soft tissues, according to a report appearing in one of the JAMA/Archives journals, the March/April 2008 issue of Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery. Moreover, The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery reports that an estimated “30% of surgical site infections are directly deposited from the air”. The Airocide® bioconversion system may very well be the best answer to airborne pathogens yet.

In a Peer Reviewed Study, Airocide is shown to mineralize (eliminate by molecular conversion) 99.999% of all organic matter entering its reaction chamber no matter how small. Airocide employs a patented photo-catalytic nanotechnology originally developed for NASA’s scientific applications on the international space station. It produces no Ozone, needs no filters, can be wall mounted and uses no more power than a couple of light bulbs.

According to an article in NASA SCIENCE, the online publication of the National Aeronautics & Space Administration, “What lies inside [Airocide] is bad news for Anthrax. Swirling air forces spores through a bewildering maze of thin tubes bristling with hydroxyl (OH-) ions that attack and destroy pathogens. Some spores are buffeted against the (OH-) lined walls of the labyrinth. Others are caught in windy eddies where they linger, exposed to high-energy (254 nm) ultraviolet photons. Every second, one hundred billion such photons bathe the chamber -- and just one is enough to destroy a spore.”

In a study of patient records at one outpatient surgical center between 2001 and 2007 one-half percent of patients undergoing facelift surgery were found to have been impacted by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. The study conducted by Richard A. Zoumalan M.D., of Lennox Hill–Manhattan Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital and New York University School of Medicine, New York, and David B. Rosenberg, M.D., also of Lennox Hill–Manhattan Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital concluded that, “for surgical site infections, the facial plastic surgeon should have a high suspicion for MRSA as the causative pathogen”.

Because the medical, psychological and cosmetic sequelae of wound infections can be devastating, every appropriate step should be used to prevent wound infections in facial plastic surgery. Facial plastic surgeons performing rhytidectomy [facelift] and other soft tissue procedures as well as other specialists may want to consider adopting additional protocols to deal with the growing threat, particularly in an outpatient setting. Airocide bioconversion technology has a demonstrated record of pathogen reduction in surgical settings.

RESEARCH SUMMARY: Outpatient Surgery Center

Duplicate tests were performed in an operating room of an outpatient surgery facility to measure the efficacy of the Airocide system in removing airborne bacterial colony forming units (CFUs). The tests resulted in a 92% reduction in twenty-four (24) hours and a 47% reduction in one (1) hour. Click here for study details.